Softdrinks and brushing

Brushing Too Soon Damages Teeth

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Could it be that brushing more than the recommended number of times a day could do more harm the good?

In one of our recent blogs, we found out that rubbing our teeth with toothpaste (preferably after lunch) actually provides quadruple protection compared to brushing twice in a day.

Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) President, Dr. Howard R. Gamble, in an interview with the New York Times, was quoted saying, ‘with brushing, you could actually push the acid deeper into the enamel and the dentin.’

After drinking acidic drinks, the acid content burns into the enamel of the teeth and down to the dentin, a layer below the enamel.

Experts found out that teeth corrode faster when they are brushed 30 minutes right after drinking soft drinks. The acid attacks the enamel and demineralizes it much further.

Experts found out that teeth corrode faster when they are brushed 30 minutes right after drinking soft drinks.

Dentists warn that brushing within thirty minutes of eating a meal or finishing your daily cup of coffee may actually zero in on catapulting damage to your teeth.

Brushing, particularly within 20 minutes of finishing a meal, can actually drive and direct the acid deeper into our teeth. This subjects your enamel to acid-corrosion way faster than normal.

'However, after intra-oral periods of 30 and 60 min, wear was not significantly higher than in unbrushed controls,' say the researchers.  

'It is concluded that for protection of dentin surfaces at least 30 min should elapse before toothbrushing after an erosive attack.'

Visit AGD’s go-to resource for consumer dental care at www.knowyourteeth.com.